Home » Page 5

GRDC NSW Updates confront global challenges

NORTHERN NSW grain advisers and growers will gain a better insight into their role in the global soft commodities trade at the upcoming series of Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Updates.
Nanjing Night Net

Dr Ken Quail, business manager at Better Research and Innovation (BRI Australia), will present the latest information on Australia’s place in the global wheat market and what international customers are saying about Australian wheat and its performance at the three GRDC Northern Updates to be held in NSW in coming weeks.

His presentation will feature at the events to be held at the Dubbo RSL Club on February 22-23, the Trangie Research Station on February 24; and at the Warialda Golf Club on February 25.

The Updates will feature packed programs focussing on innovative responses to the challenges of modern farming, including disease risks for 2011 in the wake of the wet summer; the latest research into nematodes; and how to make more efficient use of nitrogen applications. Local issues relevant to each of the host regions will also be addressed.

GRDC northern panel chairman James Clark, said the three Updates to be held in Northern NSW during March would bring growers and advisers together with researchers.

“The GRDC updates deliver new data, practical advice and locally-focussed information to advisers and growers, with the agendas developed specifically in response to feedback from grains advisers,” Mr Clark said.

“It is a chance to understand how research levies are being invested by GRDC, which manages a northern region-specific research program of more than $25 million per year.

“This research is not only scientifically valid, but responsive to current needs and issues of producers, and is directly influenced by local and regional grower priorities.

“This is a prime opportunity for grains advisers to tap in to the latest research that will keep their advice at the cutting edge – benefiting their clients’ businesses by boosting productivity and sustainability.”

Some of the topics featured at the Northern NSW Updates include:

Cereal diseases – What are the carry over cereal disease issues for 2011 and how can they be managed. (Greg Platz, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), and Steve Simpfendorfer, Industry & Investment NSW (I&I NSW)) Insights into nematode management – many growers have them but are unaware. Picking the right cereal variety can improve profit by a staggering $500/ha. (Steve Simpfendorfer, I&I NSW; Tim Clewett, & Roslyn Reen, DEEDI) Chickpea disease risks in 2011 – the wet end to 2010 and the outbreaks of ascochyta and botrytis grey mould will have implications for 2011 variety and paddock selection. (Kevin Moore, I&I NSW) Getting nutrition right in 2011 after a big year in 2010. Big crop canopies, waterlogging over summer and high levels of stubble will all affect N budgeting for 2011. (Jim Laycock, Incitec Pivot; David Herridge & Guy McMullen, I&I NSW) To register contact John Cameron or Erica McKay on 02 9482 4930 or email [email protected]南京夜网419论坛 . For details of the agendas for each Update or for more information, visit 梧桐夜网grdc南京夜网419论坛/updatedates

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Qld producers still open for business

Supporting local producers, Phil Rhodes, co-owner South Bank Surf Club restaurant, Brisbane, and chef Sydney Stranger, where only Queensland and Australian produce is used, are pictured with Ballandean Estate winery brand development manager, Stuart Ostle. Picture: RODNEY GREEN
Nanjing Night Net

LISTEN to various sections of the media, and you could be forgiven for thinking all of Queensland’s producers have had their operations ground to a halt from the recent floods.

Certainly, many have been devastated by the floods, but a great many are still operating or starting to get back on their feet and have produce and value-added goods to offer consumers.

In response to this situation, a motivated group of business people, primary producers and restaurateurs with the support of the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), have set up a website, 梧桐夜网supportqldproducers.net to allow retailers, wholesalers and growers of local Queensland produce the opportunity to let consumers and potential stockists know how they can still access their products despite the recent devastation.

Support QLD Producers has been set up as a not-for-profit organisation to provide a forum for industry to get the message out that they are still operating and to let Australia know what they have to offer and where it is available.

Stuart Ostle, brand development manager for award-winning Granite Belt winery Ballandean Estate is one of the central figures behind the website.

“Originally I thought, how do we get the message out that we (Ballandean Estate) are still up and running and then I thought well there’s hundreds of other producers in the same position, hence the website,” Mr Ostle said.

“Some people have lost produce but others have lost their market as well, and so some producers are really doing it tough.

“And it’s not just direct damage from flooding but the knock-on effect of not being able to get a product to a market or a market to you because of road closures.

“Australians know that farmers and other primary producers are the backbone of many regional communities, and that so many of them have been dramatically affected by the floods, while many more have lost everything.

“However it is important that we realise that there still are a great number of producers that are still operating, even if at a reduced level, and they still have products to sell.

“We also want to give the producers that have lost everything, including their immediate market, a place to start once they get back up and running.

“The last few weeks have seen many Australians prepared to chip in and help out to get Queensland up and running, so the next time you are wondering `how can I help?’ make sure you choose Queensland grown and help get the producers back on their feet.”

Mr Ostle said while the Ballandean Estate winery itself hadn’t suffered flood damage beyond erosion from huge amounts of rain and burst dam banks, road closures had curtailed a lot of festive season/New Year trade for many cellar doors on the Granite Belt.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Qld producers still open for business

Supporting local producers, Phil Rhodes, co-owner South Bank Surf Club restaurant, Brisbane, and chef Sydney Stranger, where only Queensland and Australian produce is used, are pictured with Ballandean Estate winery brand development manager, Stuart Ostle. Picture: RODNEY GREEN
Nanjing Night Net

LISTEN to various sections of the media, and you could be forgiven for thinking all of Queensland’s producers have had their operations ground to a halt from the recent floods.

Certainly, many have been devastated by the floods, but a great many are still operating or starting to get back on their feet and have produce and value-added goods to offer consumers.

In response to this situation, a motivated group of business people, primary producers and restaurateurs with the support of the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), have set up a website, 梧桐夜网supportqldproducers.net to allow retailers, wholesalers and growers of local Queensland produce the opportunity to let consumers and potential stockists know how they can still access their products despite the recent devastation.

Support QLD Producers has been set up as a not-for-profit organisation to provide a forum for industry to get the message out that they are still operating and to let Australia know what they have to offer and where it is available.

Stuart Ostle, brand development manager for award-winning Granite Belt winery Ballandean Estate is one of the central figures behind the website.

“Originally I thought, how do we get the message out that we (Ballandean Estate) are still up and running and then I thought well there’s hundreds of other producers in the same position, hence the website,” Mr Ostle said.

“Some people have lost produce but others have lost their market as well, and so some producers are really doing it tough.

“And it’s not just direct damage from flooding but the knock-on effect of not being able to get a product to a market or a market to you because of road closures.

“Australians know that farmers and other primary producers are the backbone of many regional communities, and that so many of them have been dramatically affected by the floods, while many more have lost everything.

“However it is important that we realise that there still are a great number of producers that are still operating, even if at a reduced level, and they still have products to sell.

“We also want to give the producers that have lost everything, including their immediate market, a place to start once they get back up and running.

“The last few weeks have seen many Australians prepared to chip in and help out to get Queensland up and running, so the next time you are wondering `how can I help?’ make sure you choose Queensland grown and help get the producers back on their feet.”

Mr Ostle said while the Ballandean Estate winery itself hadn’t suffered flood damage beyond erosion from huge amounts of rain and burst dam banks, road closures had curtailed a lot of festive season/New Year trade for many cellar doors on the Granite Belt.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Dorpers/White Dorpers join forces

A MAJOR step forward for the Australian prime lamb and cleanskin sheep industries has taken place with the establishment of a new Australian Dorper/White Dorper Association (ADWDA).
Nanjing Night Net

This body has been set up to have national representation and a core focus on the commercial sheep industry.

Speaking on behalf of the inaugural board of the ADWDA, president Neil Gadsden, Victoria said, “The growth in the Dorper and White Dorper breeds has been exceptional, but it is now time to take them forward, beyond individual stud breeder interests to a united group encompassing the total sheep industry chain.

“We see this association being a real paddock to plate organisation, representing all facets of the industry, whether they be producers, processors, marketers, retailers or consumers.”

“This commercial focus and representation, plus continual interchange of information and ideas will keep breeders informed and focused on producing the type of Dorpers required by the commercial industry and consumers.

“Australia’s history is littered with breeds of livestock that have fallen by the wayside because they did not have a wide commercial and national focus,” Mr Gadsden said.

He stressed that stud breeder members must strive to continually improve the carcase attributes, performance levels and ease of management characteristics that have made the Dorper breeds so successful in a wide variety of environments in this country, but especially in arid, low rainfall areas.

The breeds have succeeded where others have struggled due to attributes such as non selective grazing, doing ability in all conditions, low maintenance, non seasonal joining, high fertility, low birth weights, ability to rejoin during lactation, excellent carcase quality and yield.

Mr Gadsden said these attributes make the Dorper breeds ideal for use as either self replacing flocks, or in a traditional terminal composite role.

Mr Gadsden encouraged people interested in the Dorper and White Dorper breeds to view the new Association website ( australiandorper南京夜网 ) for updated information, or to contact one of the inaugural board members.

He indicated the current board was primarily a steering committee for the first 12 months, but amongst its objectives would be the setting up of information field days, working on quality guidelines and moving towards the establishment of continual supply channels of Dorper lamb to consumers.

Mr Gadsden explained that the registration procedures for stud members of the new Australian Association were being radically simplified. Stud rams would now be the only remaining group of animals requiring compulsory registration, with the decision to register stud ewes being optional for seedstock members.

He said the ADWDA would also set up an Appendix grading-up register that will greatly assist some breeders to become involved in seedstock production.

“There is enough carcase data around nowadays to verify that Dorpers produce as good a quality lamb as you can get. We are in the business of getting a quality product off our properties as soon as possible and we passionately believe the Dorper breeds can do this in a terminal sire situation better than all other breeds.

However for those wanting all the other benefits Dorpers offer in a self replacing flock, they can start to get Dorper production and management advantages at the F2 stage,” Mr Gadsden said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New Year, a new career in rural Queensland

ARE you looking for a new career in 2011? Primary industries is shaping up as the place to work in Australia with employment demand expected to increase by 27 100 jobs over the next five years.
Nanjing Night Net

According to the latest Queensland rural skills and training demand report from the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), the current rural skills shortage means employers are urgently seeking new workers.

Di Edelman, Coordinator of Rural Industry Skilling in DEEDI, said a critical issue facing Queensland is the attraction and retention of a skilled rural workforce.

“Queensland employs around 84 900 people in the agriculture, forestry and fishing industries,” Ms Edelman said.

“In recent years, rural businesses have struggled to maintain capacity due to a shortage of labour caused by competition from other industries, poor promotion, and an ageing population.

“Agriculture is reported to have the oldest workforce in Australia, with the average age for workers being 48 years.

“This has led to an urgent need to attract new people to the industry, and ensure they have the right skilling to work in today’s rural environment.

“The strongest job growth is expected in sheep, beef cattle and grain farming.

“The rural skills report surveyed producers statewide, who identified a need for generic skill sets across Queensland.

“Those skills include soil health and nutrition, weed identification and management, erosion and soil conservation, and pest management.”

Ms Edelman said that to develop these skill sets industry needs improved training delivery.

“Stronger partnerships are needed between industry and the training providers to better deliver targeted training,” said Ms Edelman.

“Producers want more e-learning tools to improve access to training.

“Traineeships and apprenticeships also need to be improved as a way to attract new workers to primary industries.

“The recommendations in the report will help the Department of Education and Training (DET) make targeted investment decisions in rural training.

“As a result of the 2008 report recommendation to increase animal laboratory research skills, The University of Queensland and DET have introduced a new Diploma in Animal Technology and welcomed their first graduates.

“It’s important that we continue to identify training needs to build a skilled workforce, and expand career opportunities for new people to enter primary industries.”

For a copy of Queensland rural skills and training demand report, visit 梧桐夜网deedi.qld.gov419论坛 and click on ‘Agriculture’ or call 13 25 23.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Deere debuts clog-free drip line

Five years of research and testing have culminated in its D5000 flow-regulated drip lineMORE usually associated with high horsepower tractors and headers, machinery giant John Deere has selected Australia to be the first country to commercially manufacture and supply a drip line product with appeal to our irrigation industry.
Nanjing Night Net

Five years of research and testing have culminated in its D5000 flow-regulated drip line being sourced from John Deere Water’s Melbourne production facility.

“The worldwide launch of a drip line product in this country reflects John Deere Water’s commitment to the Australian agricultural sector as growers strive for increased irrigation efficiency improvements,” managing director, John Deere Water Australia/New Zealand, Peter Wanckel said.

Available in various configurations to meet the needs of individual growers, Deere’s D5000 product is available in diameters up to 27mm. This is said to make the drip line ideal for long run lengths often required in vineyard, cotton and almond enterprises.

Developed with a pressure regulating capability of 50 – 350kPa, Deere says the increased pressure envelope is especially useful over undulating terrain where pressures at the bottom of slopes can easily build to more than 300kPa.

An interesting aspect of Deere’s D5000 Drip Line technology lies in its resistance to clogging – even after foreign particles were deliberately added into the water source.

Specifically designed for Australian conditions and applications, its engineers have come up with a dripper with three large inbuilt parallel inlets, also a labyrinth with a large cross sectional area.

The combination of these two features is the key to reducing clogging, principally by creating more area for foreign particles to flow.

And an additional self-cleaning function within the dripper looks to be an added bonus.

Deere says as dirt particles accumulate in the dripper, pressure also builds up against the top layer of the diaphragm.

This pressure imbalance causes the diaphragm to open to release the particles, ready for the diaphragm to resume normal flow regulation once the dirt particles have been freed from the system.

The upshot leaves Deere claiming its D5000 product is the most clog resistant mainstream drip line on the market.

* Visit 梧桐夜网johndeerewater南京夜网419论坛

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

WA announces natural disaster relief package

THE state government has announced a funding package to support those affected by natural disaster and in need of relief and recovery support.
Nanjing Night Net

The government said that it is committed to assisting small businesses, primary producers, churches, sporting associations and voluntary non-profit organisations whose assets have been destroyed or damaged as a result of a declared natural disaster caused by bushfire, cyclone, earthquake, storm, flood, natural hazard, meteorite strike, storm surge, tornado, landslide or tsunami.

The relief package is designed to assist in meeting the needs of Primary Producers whose assets or primary production business has/have been affected by a disaster for which the WA Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements (WANDRRA) have been invoked.

Assistance would not generally be available where adequate insurance could have been obtained. The government noted that the scheme is not intended to provide compensation for losses suffered. Support is to be offered on a needs basis.

The WANDRRA program is managed by the Fire and Emergency Services Authority (FESA), and is administered by the Department of Agriculture and Food WA (DAFWA), Farm Business Development Unit in conjunction with FESA (telephone 9323 9552).

To apply for support, an Application Form should be completed and forwarded to the Farm Business Development Unit of the Department.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Swan opts to fight states, not the miners

Wayne Swan.This time last year, Wayne Swan had spent his holidays reading a top-secret copy of the Henry review, which urged a 40 per cent tax on the mining industry.
Nanjing Night Net

A year on, with one prime minister removed after taking on the miners, the Treasurer’s holiday reading was a far cry from Dr Henry’s tome.

Shortly before Christmas, the former BHP chairman Don Argus handed Swan a report outlining the much watered-down resource rent tax, which has been welcomed by the big miners.

But although he now has much of the industry on side, Swan’s quest to extract more tax from the mining industry is far from over.

After what he admits was a ”bruising” encounter with mining heavyweights in 2010, Swan has effectively swapped a fight with the miners for a stoush with the states.

He is now pleading with Queensland and Western Australia to cap future mining royalties to keep the industry competitive – and the states are having none of it.

Swan’s decision to take on the states raises questions about just how powerful the mining heavyweights have become, with the industry expected to resume hostilities if the government cannot get the states on side.

Making matters more complex, Swan’s showdown with the states comes amid growing evidence Australia should be saving more of the proceeds from the once-in-a-century resources bonanza.

In the turbulent weeks after Julia Gillard replaced Kevin Rudd, quelling the mining industry’s anger was a top priority in Canberra.

She largely achieved this in early July, signing a breakthrough agreement with the big three – BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto and Xstrata – to soften the tax considerably.

Rather than the 40 per cent tax proposed by Henry, it was agreed miners would pay effective tax rates of 22.5 per cent and enjoy generous deductions. Miners called off their anti-government ad campaign, and restarted work on shelved projects worth billions to the economy.

But although Gillard’s deal with the miners was hailed as a smart political move at the time, it now looks like a temporary solution.

In the secret July negotiations, the boss of BHP, Marius Kloppers, insisted that all state royalties – including future increases – would be refunded by the federal government.

Canberra later hinted it might not credit all future royalties because this would amount to writing states a blank cheque, but Argus’s report affirmed that all future royalties should be refunded.

Swan is widely expected to adopt this recommendation, and has already called on states to promise they won’t increase royalties.

However, the request has been met with vocal opposition from the premiers of Queensland and Western Australia, setting the scene for heated negotiations this year.

The floods – expected to slash Queensland’s royalty revenue – add another layer of complexity. Nevertheless, Swan has elected to fight the states rather than risk provoking the miners. His willingness to do so raises questions about just how powerful the mining industry has become.

The opposition’s spokesman on mining, Ian Macfarlane, says it is now clear the government rushed to sign a deal without fully understanding the consequences. While he opposes the tax in principle, Macfarlane also recognises the power the Big Three held over government.

”I suspect that the government has got itself so far in that they will have to bow down to the mining companies. They got skinned and that’s a fact,” he says.

”The mining companies have achieved the effective abolition of state royalties.” Macfarlane doesn’t blame the miners for this – instead pointing the finger at Canberra’s failure to consult with the industry and states before it announced the original 40 per cent tax.

On the government’s side, the Labor senator Doug Cameron is even more frank about how miners have thrown their weight around this year. ”I think the behaviour of the miners is the most overt case of big business using their power and privileged place in society to protect their own individual interests,” Cameron says.

”This is going to be something that is debated for many years, in relation to how you can ensure the national interest is placed before the interests of mega-rich mining magnates.” More sympathetic observers, however, say the miners were able to make a convincing argument against paying more tax because the public identified with the industry.

A former head of the Minerals Council, David Buckingham, says miners benefited from a perception that the industry had been an important factor in Australia weathering the global financial crisis. Over the previous decade, he says, the industry had also remade its public image around its handling of environmental and Aboriginal issues.

”There’s been an evolution in the position of the industry. I don’t think it’s simply been a case of a big ugly industry using its muscle,” says Buckingham, who supported the concept of a super profits tax.

Whatever the reasons for the government’s backdown, the miners’ strong influence over government will linger.

If Canberra cannot reach a deal with the states, miners have made it clear they will consider restarting their campaign of destabilisation.

In the weeks before Christmas, the boss of Xstrata Coal, Peter Freyberg, repeated his warning that the company would review $20 billion in planned projects if the government failed to refund all royalties.

Indeed, some official sources suggest the mining companies are deliberately seeking to exploit the government’s razor-thin majority in the lower house in anticipation of the debate heating up.

Small miners – who remain deeply opposed to the tax – would only need to convince a few rural independents to oppose the tax to defeat it. Coalition senators are now leading an inquiry which has aired small miners’ concerns, and is scrutinising the government’s deal with the big three.

In spite of this tension between the government and smaller miners over the tax, there is growing economic evidence that now is the right time for a meaningful resource rent tax. In November, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said the government’s mining tax was too narrow – and it should tax more products than iron ore, coal and gas.

While it supported the tax overall, the OECD said this focus on only parts of the resources sector could distort investment and would hurt its ability to raise revenue.

The governor of the Reserve Bank, Glenn Stevens, has also reminded the government that with a once-in-a-century mining boom gathering pace, now could be a good time to increase public sector saving.

In a November speech, he suggested a ”stabilisation fund” that could offset some of the volatility of a commodities boom led by China and India. Stevens didn’t mention the mining tax – but it’s increasingly clear the watered-down MRRT won’t be taking much heat out of the mining boom.

An economist at the Grattan Institute, Saul Eslake, is blunt when asked if the tax could help deal with some of the challenges of the two-speed economy. ”No, because it was not intended to, and now it would seem there are so few companies that are going to pay it,” Eslake says.

Even among companies which will pay the tax – it only applies to those earning more than $50 million a year – there are doubts it will raise the revenue Canberra claims.

According to official estimates, it will raise $7.4 billion, down from the previous $10.5 billion predicted before the election and $12 billion under Rudd’s super profits tax.

The government says the latest revision was driven by the strong Australian dollar, but analysts say the forecast was more likely slashed after officials consulted with companies about how the tax would be paid in practice.

And with each downgrade in how much revenue it will raise, the government is also pushing the friendship with the Greens, needed to pass it through the Senate in 2011.

The Greens leader, Bob Brown, sent the government a reminder in late December that his support is not guaranteed. He described the tax as a ”patched-up deal between the government and the mining barons”. He prefers the 40 per cent tax favoured by Rudd, and it is not clear whether he will support the mineral resource rent tax.

Cobbling together support from Brown, miners and the premiers of mining boom states won’t be easy. But this is the task facing Swan if he is to make the mining tax a reality.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Liquor licence challenge for rodeos

The fenced alcohol consumption area at the Carrieton Rodeo.IT ONLY takes one or two troublemakers in a licenced area to make obtaining a liquor licence difficult.
Nanjing Night Net

Wilmington Rodeo on Saturday night had to re-structure its alcohol consumption areas to help gain a liquor license.

Like the Carrieton Rodeo at the end of last month, alcohol consumption areas at Wilmington Rodeo had to be secure with fencing and security guards, so minors could be excluded.

President Kerry Modystach said the committee had no choice and faced running a “dry” rodeo if it didn’t provide the fencing.

“They are trying to stamp out under-age drinking and I think we did that,” Mr Modystach said.

The Wilmington Rodeo submitted its liquor licence application several weeks prior to the rodeo but, when they heard Carrieton had difficulties obtaining a liquor license, they decided to act.

Mr Modystach said they hadn’t heard from the Office of the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner about their application and decided to act upon it, hiring a lawyer to come to an agreement so they could have their licence.

“We will have more time next year. We will try to see whether they will let us get a permit to let under-ages (under 18 years of age) in with their families,” Mr Modystach said.

“If we didn’t have alcohol we wouldn’t …it’s the families we want.”

With double the number of security guards (16) and an excellent police presence, Mr Modystach believed they did a good job in the time they had.

Wilmington Rodeo has two bars, a small one on the northern side and the main one on the southern side, Mr Modystach would like to see families with their children able to enter the northern drinking area, in a security-controlled environment.

“As soon as the rodeo is finished we shut the small bar, I don’t see it as a problem,” Mr Modystach said.

“The other thing that worries me is are they (OLGC) just attacking rodeos and why are they attacking?”

Mr Modystach said the positive aspects of the caged areas were that no alcohol was taken outside, and it was safe for all including the horses and spectators.

Families could also take their children to get food or hop on a ride without feeling intimidated by intoxicated people with glass bottles and cans.

“There was no drinking outside, that’s been stopped and I think that’s a good thing. People can walk around and know they are safe,” Mr Modystach said.

His wife Jill said she thought the areas worked well, and if this was how it was going to be in future, people were going to have to get used to them.

“But it is nice to be able to grab a drink, sit on the mound and watch with your family,” she said.

A spokesperson for the OLGC said short-term events where liquor is sold require a Limited Licence under the Liquor Licensing Act 1997.

“The Act regulates the sale, supply and consumption of liquor. Importantly one major objective of the Act is to ensure that minors aren’t exposed to liquor and the penalties reflect this,” the spokesperson said.

The licence authorises the sale and consumption of liquor on a temporary basis and is subject to the provisions of the Act and any conditions attached to the licence.

“Conditions can be imposed such as restricting minors on the licensed areas, the number of security to be present, and first aid officers being provided during the hours of operation of the licence,” the spokesperson said.

“At one event in particular, concerns were raised by police as unaccompanied minors were present after midnight.

“As the applicant couldn’t ensure that unaccompanied minors wouldn’t be present after midnight, the licence was granted with agreement between the licensee through its legal representative and police, with a smaller area,” the spokesperson said.

“Recently Limited Licences were granted to rodeo clubs that had legal representation for smaller areas. The decision on the smaller areas was arrived at agreement through legal representation with police and not by arbitration. The rodeo clubs agreed to the smaller areas,” the OLGC spokesperson said.

With several applications received every month for liquor licences each is assessed on it’s own merit, taking in consideration the views of local council and police.

There has been no change in the Liquor Licensing Act.

“Smaller areas allow the opportunity for rodeo clubs to better manage the area and to ensure compliance with their licence conditions and the requirements of the Act,” the OLGC spokesperson said.

“All applications are assessed on their own merits and take into account a range of issues including where there have been any previous issues on the event, the number of persons estimated to be present, the size of the area.”

Brevet Sergent Louise Manhire, of Booleroo Centre Police, said the fenced off areas at Wilmington Rodeo assisted in detecting minors.

“It decreased the (number of) fights and made it a lot easier from our point of view,” she said.

“From what people told me it’s really only been positives.”

Bvt Sgt Manhire said the carpark area was the issue which was addressed with an increased police presence including two mounted police officers.

The caged areas also kept glass away from horses, competitors and families, making the areas outside safer.

“We are working with council to make it a dry zone…we had an issue with people throwing bottles at the mounted police,” she said.

Bvt Sgt Manhire said some of the challengess with Wilmington and Carrieton rodeos was their proximity to Christmas and New Year, making it difficult to find police officers available to work.

Bvt Sgt Manhire said it’s a possibility these areas could stay like they are and it’s not just the minors who misbehave it’s also some adults.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Scholarship to focus on wild radish, glyphosate

GRDC Grains Industry Research Scholarship recipient Mike Ashworth. New Western Australian research could help reduce the risks of wild radish developing resistance to the important knockdown herbicide glyphosate.
Nanjing Night Net

Western Australian No-Tillage Farmers Association (WANTFA) researcher Mike Ashworth has been awarded a Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) scholarship to conduct the research as part of a PhD.

The research will be conducted at the Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI), based at The University of Western Australia (UWA), in collaboration with WANTFA.

Mr Ashworth will explore the risks of wild radish developing resistance to glyphosate associated with changing use patterns of this herbicide, and examine strategies aimed at reducing the risks.

He said wild radish was WA’s worst dicot weed, and in many areas where it had developed resistance to Group B, C, F and I herbicides, it was a more significant weed than annual ryegrass.

“With these modes of action no longer effective against wild radish, growers are looking to herbicides like glyphosate to control it,” Mr Ashworth said.

“Given the past use of glyphosate to control wild radish, and the new use patterns, selection pressures are likely to increase, therefore increasing the risk of glyphosate resistance developing.”

Mr Ashworth said the introduction of glyphosate tolerant canola to WA offered many benefits including improved weed control, early seeding and the maintenance of no-till systems.

However, as with other weeds, careful management of glyphosate was needed to reduce the chance of wild radish becoming resistant to this important herbicide.

Other factors which might increase the risks included the increased use of glyphosate in late season crop applications and to maintain winter fallows.

“My research will include widespread surveying of wild radish in glyphosate tolerant canola, and strategies – such as crop competition, glyphosate application timing and application rates – which could help prevent resistance in wild radish,” Mr Ashworth said.

Mr Ashworth’s research will be supervised by AHRI director Professor Stephen Powles, Associate Professor Michael Walsh, of AHRI, and UWA lecturer in agronomy Dr Ken Flower.

The GRDC supports Grains Industry Research Scholarships to encourage post graduate training contributing to research priorities of the Australian grains industry.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.