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RDAA to help flood affected Doctors get back to work

KEY Rural Health Organisations are banding together to help their flood affected colleagues get back
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up and running after many lost their entire surgeries to the floods.

Dr Paul Mara, president of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) said that getting medical

services running as quickly as possible should be a key priority for these communities.

“Rural towns often struggle to get doctors, even when they haven’t been washed away by a flood,” Dr Mara

said.

“The medical practices in these towns were already busy, even before they had to deal with the increased

health risks from contaminated flood water and drinking water, as well as the accidents that occur during the

clean-up.

“It is essential that we get doctors back as quickly as possible, not only for the communities’ health needs

during this period, but also for the morale of recovering communities to know their medical service is reestablished.”

The RDAA has met with the key rural health organisations, the Australian College of Rural and Remote

Medicine, Health Workforce Queensland and the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, to discuss the

coordination of these efforts.

“We have resolved to form a ‘working group’ to help coordinate efforts to get medical practices back to these

communities, and to provide support to keep them running over the next critical period of re-establishment,”

Dr Mara said.

“By working with Queensland Health; other Government agencies and key stakeholders and the many

doctors who have already volunteered their assistance, we will develop and promote strategies for the

recovery and rebuilding of sustainable rural medical practices”.

“As a group we will gather, collate and disseminate information such as affected areas, affected doctors and

offers of assistance, to pass on to relevant authorities”.

“We will also represent a united voice to communicate with both State and Federal government and to

advocate for rural doctors and rural communities,” Dr Mara said.

“We are urgently gathering information on just how many rural doctors and surgeries have been impacted by

the flood disaster across Queensland and other states, in order to seek special assistance from the Federal

Government and relevant State governments”.

“We ask all affected doctors to contact us so we can make a register of what is needed and help arrange for

relief. We have had a great response from other doctors across Australia offering what support they can, so

it is imperative we know how best to distribute and coordinate this aid.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
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Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Dubbo no longer a cheap place for fuel

Motorists are forking out marginally less for petrol at Dubbo than they were a fortnight ago, but the bargain prices west of the mountains are still to be found at Forbes and Lithgow.
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The average daily price for one litre of unleaded petrol at Dubbo on Tuesday was 129.8 cents, the latest figures published by the state’s peak motoring group showed.

The National Roads and Motorists Association (NRMA) ranked Dubbo at number 43 on its list of more than 50 locations in NSW and Canberra, from cheapest to most expensive.

But some inland centres boasted some of the cheapest petrol prices in the state on Tuesday.

Forbes continued its long run of competitiveness, with the average daily price of 115.9 cents per litre, the NRMA data showed.

Lithgow offered 119.8 and Bathurst was not far behind with an average price of 120.3 cents.

Dubbo on Tuesday was consistent with the result for the week ending December 20, when it had an average price of 129.8 cents and was in 40th position, the NRMA data showed.

For the week ending December 13 the average price was 1.5 cents higher – 131.3 cents – but it ranked at number 38.

It’s a far cry from early March this year when Dubbo had the second-cheapest average price, according to the NRMA data.

But consumers may yet get a win with news they may soon be able to find the cheapest petrol near them with the help of apps powered by data that the country’s biggest petrol retailers tried to keep secret.

The competition watchdog has ended court proceedings against the retailers after the information service they use to exchange pricing data agreed to share the information with the public.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has long been concerned about the exchange, operated by a company called Informed Sources, which allowed retailers including BP, Caltex, Woolworths and Coles to exchange site-by-site petrol price information every 15 to 30 minutes.

The ACCC alleged that the retailers’ ability to communicate price data with each other could crimp competition.

But under a new agreement with BP, Caltex, Woolworths and 7-Eleven, Informed Sources has agreed to provide the regular pricing data to consumers at the same as it is provided to the retailers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

More support needed for DV victims

FOLLOWING the launch of a new report into domestic violence by the state government, local drug and violence campaigner Lynn Field has made calls to ensure adequate support is given to all victims of family violence.
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While Ms Field was pleased the state government was taking measures to stamp out domestic violence, she said it was imperative there are services in place for women, men and kids who can all be victims of the abhorrent crime.

“It is not a female or a male issue, this is a violence issue,” she said.

“A study has come out from a Victorian University that said men are victims of domestic violence 40 per cent of the time.

“We need to make sure there are services for them and for the kids who are often caught up in this.”

The report, titled the NSW Domestic Violence Justice Strategy (DVJS) Bulletin, details several reforms the state government has introduced that are aimed at changing the way the justice system tackles domestic violence and supports victims.

Dubbo MP and Minister for Justice and Police Troy Grant said the bulletin provided a snapshot of domestic violence data across the state and outlines the steps that have been taken in delivering better support for victims and tougher measures for perpetrators.

“Our important reforms are improving the way the justice system and police respond to domestic violence,” he said.

“This is not an overnight fix though and we’ll continue our work to combat this horrific crime that impacts all parts of the community.”

Some of the key achievements achieved in 2014-15 include allowing victims to give their main evidence via a pre-recorded video or audio statement, allowing senior police to issue provisional Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVOs) on the spot and allowing greater information sharing between government agencies to facilitate victims’ access to support services and ensuring priority is given to those victims who are at greater risk of a serious threat of violence.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Sports Year in Review: Highlights from 2015

There have been some great plays, wins and losses this year in Great Lakes sports. Here are some of the best from each month.
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JANUARY:Good crowds at Seafood Race Day

A bumper crowd attended the annual Seafood Race Day at the Tuncurry racecourse under glorious weather to witness a five-race card. Dancing Daydream, ridden by Leanne Henry, won the feature race, the Tuncurry Beach Bowling Club Oyster Cup (1400m). Full story here

FEBRUARY:Boats battle for Rob Scott

This year’s Battle of the Boats was dedicated to Rob Scott who was struck in the head while visiting Fresno in the US last year. Funds were raised to assist in his recovery. Crews from Sydney up to Woolgoolga battled it out for $8000 in prize money. Full story here

MARCH: NSW are top cops at bowls titles

NSW convincingly won the 57th Australian Police Bowling Championships. The week-long tournament was hosted by the Tuncurry Beach Bowling Club and involved 180 serving and retired police officers from around Australia. Full story here

APRIL:Top 10 at international slalom champs

Forster brothers Kaspar and Kristian Fiebig finished ninth at the ICF Canoe Slalom Junior and Under 23 World Championships in Brazil. The brothers made up a world class field of 300 athletes from 45 countries to take on the rapids of Foz Do Iguassu. Full story here

MAY:Nationals eludes Tuncurry bodyboarder

Tuncurry’s Josh Smith narrowly missed out on a spot at nationals after placing third in the open drop knee event. Smith received an overall place of fifth on the leaderboard. Full story here

JUNE:Forster ready to perform at Mollymook

Forster Surf Life Saving Club IRB team head to Mollymook for the NSW State Championships. The team wa s full of confidence after completing two rounds of the NSW IRB Premiership. In the last of the premiership rounds at Kiama Downs, the team finished the day with eight out of a possible 10 finals and came away in sixth position. Full story here

JULY:Great Lakes are state netball champs

After finishing fourth last year, Great Lakes came back to win the Netball NSW State Age Under-14 championship in Penrith. Fullstoryhere

AUGUST: Third grand final in a row for Dolphins

The Forster Tuncurry Dolphins rugby union club claimed their third grand final in a row against the Gloucester Cockies. They won 17-6. Full story here

SEPTEMBER:Salt wins BL’s Blast Off under-8s

Boomerang Beach surfer Leila Salt took out the Girls 8’s division of the BL’s Blast Off in Sydney. She also got to meet former surfing world champion and event organiser Barton Lynch.

OCTOBER:Heath proves doctors wrong in Hawaii

Former Great Lakes local Nat Heath finished his first Ironman World Championship in Hawaii. He was diagnosed with the rare and potentially life-threatening Guillain-Barre syndrome. Heath flew the Aboriginal flag a he crossed the finish line. Full story here

NOVEMBER:Smith qualifies for Ironman 70.3

Forster’s Hayden Smith will compete at the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in the Sunshine Coast next year after qualifying in Port Macquarie. Smith finished fifth in the 35-39 year age group with a time of four hours, 26 minutes and 30 seconds at the 70.3 Port Macquarie Ironman on October 17. Full story here

DECEMBER:Body on the line at cricket nationals

Tuncurry’s Anita Handono was part of the ACT NSW Country team that won the under-15 Cricket Australia National Championships in Hobart. Handono’s team shattered records, and Handono knocked herself out in the grand final against Queensland while stopping a four. Full story here

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

USA tops international bucket list for travel

Dubbo’s Corey, Chris and Sean Patrick at Chicago’s Cloud Gate sculpture, dubbed The Bean, during their American adventure in November. A new survey shows the USA is the top destination on the travel bucket lists of western NSW residents. Photo: contributedDubbo’s Chris Patrick took his sons on an American adventure this year and many more of their compatriots wish to follow in their footsteps, a new survey shows.
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The USA was the top international bucket list destination for travellers from both western NSW and Australia, the latest annual “State of the Nation” report by travel search site Expedia南京夜网419论坛 found.

The online survey of 5450 people found 80 per cent of adults in western NSW had been overseas, slightly below the 84 per cent of Australians nationally who had taken a trip beyond the country’s shores.

And 99 per cent of travellers from western NSW said they had a “travel bucket list” – a list of the destinations they want to visit in the next five years.

The report placed the USA at the top of the list for western NSW residents, followed by England, New Zealand, Canada, France, Ireland, Fiji, Italy, Scotland and Germany.

Mr Patrick said the family’s trip had included Disney World at Florida, Atlanta, home of the World of Coca-Cola museum, Washington DC and its Wall of Remembrance, San Francisco for Alcatraz, a Black Hawks ice hockey game at Chicago, Anaheim for Disneyland’s 60th birthday and more.

“It was educational for the boys,” he said.

And they captured a moment for posterity at Chicago’s Cloud Gate sculpture, dubbed The Bean.

The report also showed that the rise of visual social media platforms and enhanced photo capabilities of smartphones had led to 87 per cent of respondents from western NSW saying great photo opportunities was a key driver when choosing a destination, slightly higher than the 85 per cent of respondents nationwide.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Smoking needs to butt out right now

GIVEN the wealth of medical knowledge we have at our fingertips nowadays, why anyone would willingly take up cigarette smoking is perplexing to say the least.
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Let’s forget for a moment the exorbitant cost of a packet of cigarettes nowadays – the health impact is alarming.

Smoking-related diseases kill almost 15,000 Australians a year. That’s 40 people every day. And men are the most likely to die – 9700 men die a year compared with 5200 women.

Cancer is the leading cause of tobacco-related deaths in men at 57 per cent. It’s marginally lower in women at 51 per cent.

Lung cancer accounts for three-in-four cancers in men (72 per cent in women). It causes the most cancer deaths in this country and that’s mainly caused by smoking.

Last week the state government released details of a discussion paper based on recommendations from the Tasmanian Health Council.

One of those recommendations was to increase the minimum smoking age in Tasmania to 21 or 25.

That’s an ambitious target, and it is retrospective, meaning people currently 18 and upwards wouldn’t be banned overnight if any such plan ever eventuated.

But there is a definite problem in Tasmania when it comes to smoking cigarettes. We’re disproportionately represented in those smoking figures. Tasmania boasts, if you can use that term, the second highest rate of smoking in Australia at just under 18 per cent. Only the Northern Territory is higher at 20.9 per cent.

Then we can throw in the cost to society. Yes, cigarettes are already heavily taxed, raking in between $5 and $6 billion a year in taxes.

But that’s minuscule compared with the costs to the country – $31.5 billion in social and economic costs, including to our health system.

With that in mind, any recommendation or plan to reduce the number of people who smoke, no matter how ambitious, should be given due consideration.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.