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RDAA to help flood affected Doctors get back to work

KEY Rural Health Organisations are banding together to help their flood affected colleagues get back
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up and running after many lost their entire surgeries to the floods.

Dr Paul Mara, president of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) said that getting medical

services running as quickly as possible should be a key priority for these communities.

“Rural towns often struggle to get doctors, even when they haven’t been washed away by a flood,” Dr Mara

said.

“The medical practices in these towns were already busy, even before they had to deal with the increased

health risks from contaminated flood water and drinking water, as well as the accidents that occur during the

clean-up.

“It is essential that we get doctors back as quickly as possible, not only for the communities’ health needs

during this period, but also for the morale of recovering communities to know their medical service is reestablished.”

The RDAA has met with the key rural health organisations, the Australian College of Rural and Remote

Medicine, Health Workforce Queensland and the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, to discuss the

coordination of these efforts.

“We have resolved to form a ‘working group’ to help coordinate efforts to get medical practices back to these

communities, and to provide support to keep them running over the next critical period of re-establishment,”

Dr Mara said.

“By working with Queensland Health; other Government agencies and key stakeholders and the many

doctors who have already volunteered their assistance, we will develop and promote strategies for the

recovery and rebuilding of sustainable rural medical practices”.

“As a group we will gather, collate and disseminate information such as affected areas, affected doctors and

offers of assistance, to pass on to relevant authorities”.

“We will also represent a united voice to communicate with both State and Federal government and to

advocate for rural doctors and rural communities,” Dr Mara said.

“We are urgently gathering information on just how many rural doctors and surgeries have been impacted by

the flood disaster across Queensland and other states, in order to seek special assistance from the Federal

Government and relevant State governments”.

“We ask all affected doctors to contact us so we can make a register of what is needed and help arrange for

relief. We have had a great response from other doctors across Australia offering what support they can, so

it is imperative we know how best to distribute and coordinate this aid.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Cruelty claims over starved bobby calves

Off to the slaughter … a calf that will be made into veal for export. Photo: Animals AustraliaANIMALS AUSTRALIA has begun a nationwide campaign using images of calves to prevent a new legal standard that would allow the abattoir-bound offspring of dairy cows to be denied liquid food for the last 30 hours of their lives.
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Calling on the public to ”demand a kinder future” for the male bobby calves bred annually so their mothers will generate milk, the animal rights group claims the calves are treated cruelly as dairy industry waste.

About 700,000 dairy-bred calves aged five days or less are sent for slaughter annually. The meat is usually exported as veal.

To end the practice, Animals Australia has placed on its website a video about the calves’ journey to death.

”We are totally opposed to 30 hours [off feed]. It’s not ethical and not scientifically credible. Most will be kept in abattoirs overnight without food or bedding, so they will be cold and hungry,” said the organisation’s executive director, Glenys Oogjes.

She wants consumers to oppose the 30-hour proposal, which is part of the Land Transport Standard due to be finalised by primary industries ministers later this year.

She claims the industry and government have not advertised public consultation on the standard which has a submission deadline of next Thursday.

The RSPCA has released its own submission to the proposed “time off feed standard” in which it recommends a maximum eight hours off feed, and points out that the role of Government regulation is to strike a balance between the needs of the livestock production industries and the needs of the animals concerned.

“The recommendation to adopt a 30-hour time off feed limit for bobby calves does not strike a balance,” the animal welfare organisation says.

“The proposed standard amendment will result in zero cost to industry and does nothing to improve the wlefare of bobby calves before, during and after transport. As susch, RSPCA Australia does not support this recommendation.”

The organisation says that the approach it advocates is the euthanasia of bobby calves on farm or, where transport is considered necessary, direct consignment to the abattoir and slaughter as soon as possible upon arrival with a maximum time off feed of 18 hours as the “outer legal limit”.

Animals Australia accused dairy farmers of keeping the fate of bobby calves secret because of potential public revulsion about newborn animals being taken from their mothers, then slaughtered.

But the chairman of the animal health and welfare unit of Australian Dairy Farmers, David Basham, said the cruelty and secrecy claims were ”rubbish” and that the consultation had been widely publicised.

The calves were not a waste product, but provided important farm income. ”We are making sure we are not wasting a meat product by euthanasing those calves on farm,” he said. ”We shouldn’t apply emotion … otherwise we wouldn’t be able to feed our world population.”

He disputed Ms Oogjes’s claims that a dairy industry-commissioned Melbourne University study endorsing the 30-hour standard was not peer reviewed. He also questioned her assertion that a calf usually eats five times a day, saying as a farmer he had seen cows feed calves in the morning, then hide them in reeds all day while they graze.

”They are trying to apply human standards on calves … Probably the worst thing you can do is to feed too often because it stimulates the stomach too much and then the calf gets diarrhoea and that leads to death,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New owner plans Kondinin growth

THE Kondinin Group’s new parent company is promising there will be no rationalisation of the 53-year-old farm research provider’s services as it merges with its new Perth-based owner.
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In fact, Aspermont Limited wants to expand Kondinin’s popular on-farm research and product testing services, expanding information services to farmers by tapping into government-based research and resources and initiating training programs.

Aspermont’s strength is in the minerals, energy and construction sectors where it supplies online information services and print publications such as Australia’s Mining Monthly, the 170-year-old London based Mining Journal, and a US coal industry magazine.

It has 13 print magazines and 12 online news services and also runs conferences.

Like Kondinin, it commissions practical research and consultancy reports specifically focused on assisting participants the mining and construction sector.

Aspermont became a joint partner in the demutualised Kondinin group in 2008, with majority stakeholder Grain Growers Association.

Chief executive officer, Colm O’Brien, said there was no danger of scaling back Kondinin’s regional office representation at Toowoomba in Queensland or Wagga Wagga in southern NSW.

“We’ve worked with Kondinin as a partner for nearly three years and are delighted to consolidate our relationship through this share repurchase,” he said.

“The strong Kondinin Group and Farming Ahead brands align closely to Aspermont’s existing brands in terms of independence of editorial content, longevity in the marketplace and strong brand recognition.”

The Kondinin business was likely to add approximately $3m of turnover to Aspermont operations, which involve about 80 Australian staff and 40 in Europe and the US.

Outgoing Kondinin chief executive officer, Richard Price, will continue in a new role, assisting to develop its strategy and industry engagement plans.

Kondinin board chairman and southern NSW farmer, Graham Barron, is retiring, but Aspermont intends to establish a larger farmer-based advisory board later this year.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Letters to the editor

New tree rules threatenkoala habitatKoalaAction Group is concerned that Redland City Council is misleading the Redland community in regard to proposed new tree clearing laws in the draft City Plan.
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In theRedland City Bulletinarticle, ‘City Plan to simplify tree clearing law’ (RCB, Dec. 9),a Council spokesman said “the City Plan would not make it easier to clear trees. Council’s intention was to regulate clearing to ensure the same or better environmental outcomes were achieved”.

The proposed new laws allow clearing up to 2500m sqof bush on rural private property for any reason at all, without Council approval, and there are approximately 1500 rural properties in Redland City. Council claims this is equivalent to or better than the current 3000m sqclearing allowance, but this presently only applies to new house approvals and there is onlya handful of properties currently without houses in the rural zone.

Many koala food trees inthe urban area currently have some form of protection under Council’s Local Law and Planning Scheme. The new City Plan proposes to have no tree protection at all on blocks less than 2000msq (half an acre). Varying rules are proposed for larger (half acre or greater) blocks in the urban footprint, but in most cases if they are mapped as environmentally significant then a 500m sqclearing limit is meant to provide protection. Many blocks of this size would not even have500msq of vegetation, so all of it could be cleared under the new rules.

These proposed new clearing laws are vastly different to Brisbane City Council laws, which have no blanket tree clearing allowances. They have a tight, prescriptive local law to protect all mapped native vegetation. This is a much more effective way to protect koala habitat.

Habitat loss is the greatest threat to our koalas, so allowing clearing of these areas just doesn’t make sense.It is clear that the Council spokesperson’s claims toRedland City Bulletin are inconsistent with what is proposed in the City Plan.

– D.Pointing, president, Koala Action Group

Toondah Harbour proposals present a riskThe Toondah Harbour proposals recently put forward by Walker Corporation do not appear to make sense from either an engineering or environmental perspective.

Additionally, I believe they pose a high risk from a financial standpoint.

Why then is our council actively supporting these proposals and potentially placing us, the ratepayers, also at risk?

Toondah Harbour, our gateway to North Stradbroke, certainly needs improving.

What is not warranted is the filling of the bay to produce what the proposals boil down to:a massive housing estate.

– C. Humphries, Cleveland

No surprise in mayor’sback-down on parksIt doesn’t surprise me the mayor has taken the parks issue off the re-zoning agenda. I suspect it was only put on so it could be taken off.

Give the residents of Redlands some proof the mayor and certain councillors are listening to community feedback before they forge ahead with their real agenda – namely, controversial re-zoning in other, more lucrative areas for developers.

With the elections only a few months away, there needed to be some evidence the council was listening to community feedback to ensure a favourable vote for sitting, ‘pro-development at any cost’councillors.

Redlandresidents need to ask their candidates some stiff questions regarding future developments, asthis area is fast becoming an outer suburb of Brisbane and is quickly losing its very special appeal to people wanting to live somewhere different.

As was saidin theeditorial (RCB, Dec. 16),the parks could end up back on the agenda very quickly.

– S. Barnes,Alexandra Hills

Litter clean-upappreciatedDriving to the station early in the mornings, I see a gentleman and his black lab walking Bloomfield Street, picking up the rubbish to keep the streets clean. I would like to say ‘thank you’for the effort he is putting into this public service of his own accord. I pick up any pieces that are seen, but I don’twalk thestreet. So thank you for looking after our streets.

Also, re Editorial Comment (RCB, Dec. 16),hear, hear to the power of the people. Keep fighting, Redlands, for 2016.

– P. Brookes,Thornlands

Christmas in the Redlands a pleasureDuring the past weeks, it has been a pleasure to hear and see in businesses, homes, streets and supermarkets throughout the Redlandsa focus on the true meaning of Christmas: nativity scenes, carols and hymns, messages of peace and goodwill. This message hasalso featuredin lovely displays at the Council librariesand a beautiful nativity scene at Redland Museum. All our local churcheshave displayed this message, too, but that goes without saying.I congratulate all those responsible for these lovely reminders.Frequently, in our modern world,this message is submerged underother Christmas activities.

National surveys have shown that the majority of Australians appreciate and want these reminders of the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem so many years ago. Not only do they celebrate thetruemeaning of Christmas, but they provide a feeling of continuity and security to those of us who have grown up with these reminders. They also offer an opportunity for our younger generation to experience the same feelings and message.

– S. Davis, Wellington Point

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

RDAA to help flood affected Doctors get back to work

KEY Rural Health Organisations are banding together to help their flood affected colleagues get back
Nanjing Night Net

up and running after many lost their entire surgeries to the floods.

Dr Paul Mara, president of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) said that getting medical

services running as quickly as possible should be a key priority for these communities.

“Rural towns often struggle to get doctors, even when they haven’t been washed away by a flood,” Dr Mara

said.

“The medical practices in these towns were already busy, even before they had to deal with the increased

health risks from contaminated flood water and drinking water, as well as the accidents that occur during the

clean-up.

“It is essential that we get doctors back as quickly as possible, not only for the communities’ health needs

during this period, but also for the morale of recovering communities to know their medical service is reestablished.”

The RDAA has met with the key rural health organisations, the Australian College of Rural and Remote

Medicine, Health Workforce Queensland and the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, to discuss the

coordination of these efforts.

“We have resolved to form a ‘working group’ to help coordinate efforts to get medical practices back to these

communities, and to provide support to keep them running over the next critical period of re-establishment,”

Dr Mara said.

“By working with Queensland Health; other Government agencies and key stakeholders and the many

doctors who have already volunteered their assistance, we will develop and promote strategies for the

recovery and rebuilding of sustainable rural medical practices”.

“As a group we will gather, collate and disseminate information such as affected areas, affected doctors and

offers of assistance, to pass on to relevant authorities”.

“We will also represent a united voice to communicate with both State and Federal government and to

advocate for rural doctors and rural communities,” Dr Mara said.

“We are urgently gathering information on just how many rural doctors and surgeries have been impacted by

the flood disaster across Queensland and other states, in order to seek special assistance from the Federal

Government and relevant State governments”.

“We ask all affected doctors to contact us so we can make a register of what is needed and help arrange for

relief. We have had a great response from other doctors across Australia offering what support they can, so

it is imperative we know how best to distribute and coordinate this aid.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

RDAA to help flood affected Doctors get back to work

KEY Rural Health Organisations are banding together to help their flood affected colleagues get back
Nanjing Night Net

up and running after many lost their entire surgeries to the floods.

Dr Paul Mara, president of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) said that getting medical

services running as quickly as possible should be a key priority for these communities.

“Rural towns often struggle to get doctors, even when they haven’t been washed away by a flood,” Dr Mara

said.

“The medical practices in these towns were already busy, even before they had to deal with the increased

health risks from contaminated flood water and drinking water, as well as the accidents that occur during the

clean-up.

“It is essential that we get doctors back as quickly as possible, not only for the communities’ health needs

during this period, but also for the morale of recovering communities to know their medical service is reestablished.”

The RDAA has met with the key rural health organisations, the Australian College of Rural and Remote

Medicine, Health Workforce Queensland and the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, to discuss the

coordination of these efforts.

“We have resolved to form a ‘working group’ to help coordinate efforts to get medical practices back to these

communities, and to provide support to keep them running over the next critical period of re-establishment,”

Dr Mara said.

“By working with Queensland Health; other Government agencies and key stakeholders and the many

doctors who have already volunteered their assistance, we will develop and promote strategies for the

recovery and rebuilding of sustainable rural medical practices”.

“As a group we will gather, collate and disseminate information such as affected areas, affected doctors and

offers of assistance, to pass on to relevant authorities”.

“We will also represent a united voice to communicate with both State and Federal government and to

advocate for rural doctors and rural communities,” Dr Mara said.

“We are urgently gathering information on just how many rural doctors and surgeries have been impacted by

the flood disaster across Queensland and other states, in order to seek special assistance from the Federal

Government and relevant State governments”.

“We ask all affected doctors to contact us so we can make a register of what is needed and help arrange for

relief. We have had a great response from other doctors across Australia offering what support they can, so

it is imperative we know how best to distribute and coordinate this aid.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
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Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Dubbo no longer a cheap place for fuel

Motorists are forking out marginally less for petrol at Dubbo than they were a fortnight ago, but the bargain prices west of the mountains are still to be found at Forbes and Lithgow.
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The average daily price for one litre of unleaded petrol at Dubbo on Tuesday was 129.8 cents, the latest figures published by the state’s peak motoring group showed.

The National Roads and Motorists Association (NRMA) ranked Dubbo at number 43 on its list of more than 50 locations in NSW and Canberra, from cheapest to most expensive.

But some inland centres boasted some of the cheapest petrol prices in the state on Tuesday.

Forbes continued its long run of competitiveness, with the average daily price of 115.9 cents per litre, the NRMA data showed.

Lithgow offered 119.8 and Bathurst was not far behind with an average price of 120.3 cents.

Dubbo on Tuesday was consistent with the result for the week ending December 20, when it had an average price of 129.8 cents and was in 40th position, the NRMA data showed.

For the week ending December 13 the average price was 1.5 cents higher – 131.3 cents – but it ranked at number 38.

It’s a far cry from early March this year when Dubbo had the second-cheapest average price, according to the NRMA data.

But consumers may yet get a win with news they may soon be able to find the cheapest petrol near them with the help of apps powered by data that the country’s biggest petrol retailers tried to keep secret.

The competition watchdog has ended court proceedings against the retailers after the information service they use to exchange pricing data agreed to share the information with the public.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has long been concerned about the exchange, operated by a company called Informed Sources, which allowed retailers including BP, Caltex, Woolworths and Coles to exchange site-by-site petrol price information every 15 to 30 minutes.

The ACCC alleged that the retailers’ ability to communicate price data with each other could crimp competition.

But under a new agreement with BP, Caltex, Woolworths and 7-Eleven, Informed Sources has agreed to provide the regular pricing data to consumers at the same as it is provided to the retailers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Solid run for wool

RECENT wool price levels are real, sustainable and not a “short term blip”, Australian Wool Innovation said this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Wool prices reached their highest US dollar level in 35 years last Wednesday with the Eastern market Indicator peaking at 1242 cents a kilogram clean, only to suffer a drop on Thursday to finish at 1191 a kg.

AWI’s market intelligence and trade reporting manager Dr Paul Swan said the Thursday price drop was only a fluctuation. The Western market Indicator decreased five cents to finish the week at 1118 cents a kg clean.

“The critical issues are the longer term trends and the fundamental drivers.

“I believe the fundamentals of the market are very, very positive and they are medium to long term – two years plus,” Dr Swan said.

“It will take years for production to recover to any substantial degree.

“Even if prices remain at present levels it will take years for production to increase, particularly against the backdrop of very high sheep meat prices,” he said.

“I believe the fundamentals are such that this is not going to be a little short term blip – it’s a culmination of a slow building of demand against a backdrop of a rundown in our stocks.”

The 1242 cent point was at the 99 percentile level for AUD prices in the last 35 years – with only nine months when higher average prices occurred in the Reserve Price Scheme days of February 1988 to January 1989, Dr Swan said.

“This is the first real substantive peak that hasn’t been associated with a price regulation scheme in the market place – it’s demand and supply.

“Our overall view is that we have very, strong evidence now that this is the collision of really, really tight global supply of the fibre with strong demand,” Dr Swan said.

He said it was premature to claim plaudits for what the market was doing now, though AWI’s past programs have played a part and its marketing programs were yet to have their full impact on the market.

Dr Swan said the current Northern Hemisphere demand trend was genuine and “genuine trends tend to last 18-24 months at least”.

He said Australian wool prices had exceeded pre-Global Financial Crisis levels, though a number of key retail markets – the United Kingdom, Ireland, Portugal and Spain – were yet to completely recover from the GFC.

“The fact that we have over the last decade seen the emergence of a demand superpower in China really augurs well for the future.”

AWI chief executive officer Stuart McCullough said the current wool prices were sustainable.

“We know that wool is in fashion in the Northern Hemisphere.”

But fashion alone was not the only demand driver, he said.

“The other driver that we have is the ‘LOHAS’ (lifestyle of health and sustainability) consumer who is very keen to buy clean, green product and feel good at the cash register.”

The third driver is Chinese domestic affluence which was not going to slow down, he said.

“We’ve got limited supply and in some ways it is a bit of a perfect storm.

“We believe that wool should be at this level or higher given the numbers of sheep in Australia.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.